Directors


Directors' duties explained. Issues for both companies and directors to consider.

Becoming a director gives status and a direct impact on the strategy and success of a business. How free is a director to act alone? What obligations and duties should a director bear in mind?

Day-to-day management of a company is delegated to the directors by its shareholders. Directors are initially appointed by the shareholders and can usually themselves appoint additional directors up to any limit set by the articles of association.

The decisions of the directors are taken collectively by the board of directors. A director cannot act as a director on his own unless only one director has been appointed. Decisions are either taken by majority vote at board meetings or by the signing by all the directors of a written resolution.

The director's role and his powers are primarily defined in the company's articles and, if he is also an employee, in his service contract.

The mere fact of appointment does not normally give a director any executive powers. Most directors are, however, also employees of the company with specific powers delegated to them. A managing director usually has extensive powers to take day-to-day decisions on behalf of the company. Other directors such as sales directors or finance directors will have a more limited role.

Directors owe a duty to the company and, if insolvency threatens, to creditors. Certain key duties of directors have been placed on a statutory footing under the Companies Act 2006 (the "Act"). These duties are owed to the company.

Directors are also subject to a number of other statutory requirements and restrictions. These include a duty to keep proper books and records and restrictions on entering into certain transactions with the company or accepting loans from the company. Breach of these duties and requirements can result in a director being disqualified from acting as a director and in many cases can lead to the director incurring personal liability. Insurance can be obtained to cover some cases of personal liability.

Chapters

Go back to Legal how to